Christ carrying the cross el greco essay

We have provided evidence and argumentation here that Christ founded a visible Church, and that this Church is visible not merely because some of its members are embodied, and not because local congregations and denominations exist. The Church Christ founded is visible because, as His Mystical Body, it necessarily has an essentially united visible hierarchy; this is the hierarchy of bishops and priests united under the episcopal successor of St. Peter, the visible head appointed by Christ. Without an essentially united visible hierarchy, Church discipline would not be possible. That is because only Catholic ecclesiology is sacramental, . non-gnostic. Any ecclesiology in which members, whether these be individual Christians or congregations, are said to be fully united to Christ’s Church through an internal invisible connection, nullifies the spiritual consequences of visible excommunication. Yet every ecclesiology denying that Christ founded an essentially united visible hierarchy must posit an invisible connection between the members and Christ. Likewise, denying that Christ founded an essentially unified visible hierarchy reduces schisms to branches, and treats them as innocuous or even desirable, falsely construing them as much-needed diversity. If that seems inconceivable, ask yourself this question: If these were not branches, but schisms, what would be different about them? Treating schisms as mere branches calls ‘good’ what is evil, so it is essential that we be able to distinguish a branch from a schism, and yet nothing short of Catholic ecclesiology makes sense of the distinction. Every ecclesiology short of Catholic ecclesiology falls into some form of ecclesial docetism, since it treats the universal Church per se as though it were not visible, not having an essentially unified hierarchy, and thus not as a Body. The bodily nature of the Church allows the Church to be both Mater et Magistra . It makes sense of Scripture’s teaching regarding the locus and universal nature of the Kingdom of Heaven presently on earth. This Kingdom is not invisible, but visible, present in the mystery of the Catholic Church. Though the Kingdom (. the Church) will achieve its fullness only when Christ returns, even now the thrones of its stewards are visible, not invisible, and its law is canon law . Reformed ecclesiology attempts to avoid denying the visibility of the Church, but without a unified visible catholic hierarchy, what Reformed ecclesiology refers to as “the visible Church” cannot be a Body, only a mere plurality of members (whether individual persons or congregations) each invisibly connected to Christ. The ‘visible Church’ terminology in Reformed ecclesiology is for that reason merely semantical, not substantive. A mere plurality of congregations is no more of a unified Body than is a mere plurality of persons. That is why Reformed ecclesiolgy in essence is indistinguishable from the ecclesiology of those who deny the visibility of the Church per se . The visibility of the Mystical Body of Christ implies that it is a definite Body that can be traced through history, that the promises Christ made concerning the Church apply to it, and that the key to the ecumenical endeavor centers not around some shared minimum of doctrinal common ground, but around the identification of the Church’s unified visible hierarchy in succession from the Apostles.

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The consensus of modern scholarship is that the New Testament accounts represent a crucifixion occurring on a Friday, but a Thursday or Wednesday crucifixion have also been proposed. [88] [89] Some scholars explain a Thursday crucifixion based on a "double sabbath" caused by an extra Passover sabbath falling on Thursday dusk to Friday afternoon, ahead of the normal weekly Sabbath. [88] [90] Some have argued that Jesus was crucified on Wednesday, not Friday, on the grounds of the mention of "three days and three nights" in Matthew before his resurrection, celebrated on Sunday. Others have countered by saying that this ignores the Jewish idiom by which a "day and night" may refer to any part of a 24-hour period, that the expression in Matthew is idiomatic, not a statement that Jesus was 72 hours in the tomb, and that the many references to a resurrection on the third day do not require three literal nights. [88] [91]

I am wrestling w/ a life changing decision for the past 2 years. On the surface it seems like a minor problem, but For me it will be a life changing decision & professionally one of no return. I have intellectualized, rationalized, “engaged in Ignatian discernment for a whole year” and have wavered between alternatives. My friends and spiritual advisors likewise seem unable to help me which is a major embarrassment to me of disappointing them in their well meaning efforts to assist me.
Today while reading the Road to Emmaus in Luke 24, my lectio was ” Was it not necessary that Christ should suffer these things to enter into His glory?”. This asked by one of the 2 disciples (one of them thought to be St. Luke himself- the writer of that Gospel) It occurred to me TODAY that this state of angst, [as you describe] like Simon of Cyrene and St Catherine of Bologna, may be my cross to carry after Jesus. I came across your article while I was searching for illumination from homilies of Our Universal Pastor-Pope Francis on The Road to Emmaus.
I could relate to ALL the 4 possible initial reactions of Simon of Cyrene you describe.
Surprise {whine, mourn,groan)—Why has this happened to a professional like me?
• Annoyance—This really puts into disarray my plans, my dreams, my life.
• Reluctance—I’m not ready for this, I can’t handle this!
• Embarrassment—I can’t let anyone see me like this.
This Lent, during my Friday Stations of the Cross,I had to ask myself the origin of the 3 Falls of Christ [not mentioned in scripture as you point out]. If the Cyrenian was conscripted to carry the Cross after the 1st Fall, how and why would the 2nd and 3rd Falls have occurred? Yet the stations give me hope that my own wavering decision making process w/ its falls, is exactly what Christ suffered for me, and so must I on my own Way of The Cross and my personal journey to Easter tide & glory. God is preparing me for what he has prepared for me. While Christ died once and lives now forever, He had His daily share of suffering my human condition from His Birth to the grave.
Thanks for your reflection.

Christ carrying the cross el greco essay

christ carrying the cross el greco essay

I am wrestling w/ a life changing decision for the past 2 years. On the surface it seems like a minor problem, but For me it will be a life changing decision & professionally one of no return. I have intellectualized, rationalized, “engaged in Ignatian discernment for a whole year” and have wavered between alternatives. My friends and spiritual advisors likewise seem unable to help me which is a major embarrassment to me of disappointing them in their well meaning efforts to assist me.
Today while reading the Road to Emmaus in Luke 24, my lectio was ” Was it not necessary that Christ should suffer these things to enter into His glory?”. This asked by one of the 2 disciples (one of them thought to be St. Luke himself- the writer of that Gospel) It occurred to me TODAY that this state of angst, [as you describe] like Simon of Cyrene and St Catherine of Bologna, may be my cross to carry after Jesus. I came across your article while I was searching for illumination from homilies of Our Universal Pastor-Pope Francis on The Road to Emmaus.
I could relate to ALL the 4 possible initial reactions of Simon of Cyrene you describe.
Surprise {whine, mourn,groan)—Why has this happened to a professional like me?
• Annoyance—This really puts into disarray my plans, my dreams, my life.
• Reluctance—I’m not ready for this, I can’t handle this!
• Embarrassment—I can’t let anyone see me like this.
This Lent, during my Friday Stations of the Cross,I had to ask myself the origin of the 3 Falls of Christ [not mentioned in scripture as you point out]. If the Cyrenian was conscripted to carry the Cross after the 1st Fall, how and why would the 2nd and 3rd Falls have occurred? Yet the stations give me hope that my own wavering decision making process w/ its falls, is exactly what Christ suffered for me, and so must I on my own Way of The Cross and my personal journey to Easter tide & glory. God is preparing me for what he has prepared for me. While Christ died once and lives now forever, He had His daily share of suffering my human condition from His Birth to the grave.
Thanks for your reflection.

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